Carbines and blunderbusses

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The carbine was shorter than a musket and was usually carried by cavalry. They were worn hanging on their right side, from a belt over their left shoulder. It was clipped on to the belt by a spring catch, a bit like a dog lead.

Carbines had either flintlocks or wheellocks and a barrel usually about thirty inches long, with a diameter that was either 18 bore or 24 bore.

The bore size refers to the number of lead balls in a pound of lead. In the case of a carbine there were either 18 or 24 balls to the pound of lead.

Flintlock carbines made in London cost about 12s 9d (2 shillings and 9 pence), but carbines imported from Europe by the Royalists cost £1 11s 0d (1 pound, 11 shillings and 0 pence).

Similar to carbines were blunderbusses. The only difference was the size of the bore, which was bigger than that of a musket. These guns were loaded with a number of small balls rather than one big ball.

Did you know?

No rust for the wicked

Wrought iron does not rust as quickly as cast iron. At Fort Nelson the Boxted Bombard, a large medieval cannon made of wrought iron is still in good condition despite being left outdoors and unprotected for hundreds of years.